NWPDC Blog

June Pet of the Month: Princess Lucky Star & Captain Luna Galacticat

While I usually call them Lucky and Luna for short, I will sometimes address these two Burmese kitties by their full names because, come on – these are fun names to say! Fun names deserve fun cats, and these sister kitties fit the bill.

Lucky and Luna were about nine months old when I started caring for them in June 2018. In fact, today is the one-year anniversary of my very first visit with them!

As you can see by their photos, these sisters look very similar. It was important that I was able to tell them apart, however, because Luna was getting regular medication for a while, so their humans pointed out that Luna has slightly darker markings, golden eyes, and is a little bit bow-legged.

 

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Of course, once I started caring for them, different personality traits emerged as well. Lucky has the most amazing dinner-time meow. It’s hard to describe, but there is no mistaking that she is telling you that she wants her wet food and she wants it NOW! Initially, Lucky was the more athletic and outgoing of the two, although Luna has come into her own over the past year and now both of them vie for the opportunity to leap into the air after a feather on a wire or a flying worm. There was a brief period during which we thought the girls were vandalizing the paper towel roll, but it turns out it was a gremlin perpetrating the mischeif, and they apprehended him and brought him to justice. However, there was no escaping responsibility for the items being removed from the top of the fridge – I caught them red-handed.

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Lucky and Luna’s humans know how important environmental enrichment is for kitties who spend most or all of their time indoors, so they always have the best toys and food puzzles on hand, but these girls also get to go out for walks with their humans when the weather is nice!

Lucky and Luna have their own Instagram account; if you’d like to follow their adventures (including a long-distance love affair between Luna and a Burmese boy from Texas named Goblin Bob), you can find them at @luckyluna_cats.

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May Pet of the Month: The Doxies

Belle, Oskar and Buster are special to me for many reasons, including the fact that they were my very first regularly-scheduled Monday-Friday dog walk clients. I have been working with these loyal, loving, spirited pooches since September 2017, and we’ve had so many wonderful adventures together.

Belle, who is around  three years old, knows what she wants and she knows how to get it. And what she often wants is to be picked up and carried for a bit while we’re out on our walks. I often indulge her, because we’d never make it around the block if I didn’t. But it’s OK, because she’s tiny, adorable, and soft, and spoiling her is hard not to do. She regularly employs other heart-melting behaviors such as hopping up and down several times on her hind legs when she gets excited; running in circles while chomping at the air and finally rolling over for belly rubs before I leash her up for our walk; and lifting her long ears straight out to the side when anticipating a treat. Her favorite game is tug of war, and she regularly defeats all who dare to challenge her in this realm.

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Belle

Oskar and Buster are brothers, and just turned 10 in January. You would never know that these guys are now officially considered senior citizens, though! They also jump in the air, usually when I first arrive and start to leash them up, although their jumps are typically combined with an attempt to land a big wet kiss on my face (or on my glasses, or up my nose), and they succeed about 25% of the time.

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Oskar
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Buster

Buster is a real champ at chasing and catching balls, and would do it all day long if he could. Of the three, he is the most enthusiastic about rolling around on the ground while we’re out on our walks, and is the only one who stays by my side after I’ve removed their leashes when we return (Belle and Oskar usually run off into the house). Both Buster and Belle love to bark at the two chickens who live in a coop in the back yard, and the chickens seem to enjoy it, because they’re always right up next to the wire giving it right back to Belle and Buster. I like to think that it’s a complicated, love/hate relationship.

Oskar is the most relaxed of the three, and when I give him his treat I always thank him for being such a gentleman. He also loves to play with balls, but can’t keep up with his lightening-fast brother when it comes to chasing/catching them, so I always make sure he has his own that he can take off to a quiet corner to chew on.

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With their exhuberance and high energy, this crew keeps me on my toes and smiling, and I hope to have many more adventures with them!

 

April Pet of the Month – Poppy & Langston

I have been caring for Poppy and Langston for a little over a year now. Their mom originally got in touch with in touch with me in January 2018, not long after she had brought Langston into the household as a companion for Poppy. She knew she would be spending a fair amount of time traveling over the next year and wanted to be sure that Poppy had some full-time companionship when she was away, aside from the daily visits from the pet sitter and the occasional drop-in visits from friends.

I recall being very impressed by her commitment to properly introducing Langston to the household; she did her research and stuck to the schedule that would ultimately ensure that these two became friends (although in the beginning, as is often the case with kitties, they were more like frenemies while they worked out the hierarchy; Langston would find himself the loving object of a grooming session one moment, and the recipient of a firm bite to the neck the next).

My visits with Poppy and Langston usually take place in the morning, when their apartment is filled with gorgeous light from the south-facing windows. As with all my kitty visits, we get the “chores” out of the way first: Food, water, litter, and any cleanup that might be required due to Poppy’s occasionally sensitive tummy.

Langston is an environmentally-conscious kitty who believes that food should never go to waste, and he always does his part to make sure that never happens in this household. However, once he has lapped up a bit of his wet food, he is quick to switch gears to play mode, and will run over to the cabinet that holds his toys and meow insistently until I produce the goods. At this point we typically retreat to the bedroom where Poppy stalks the black feathers at the end of her favorite wand while I hide and drag it behind pillows or just under the edge of the blanket, and Langston chases his favorite gold ribbon or the cardboard bits on the end of the Cat Dancer wire. My visits with Poppy and Langston are very much two-handed affairs. Poppy often trades the chasing of the feather wand for brushes and pets on my lap before too long, and Langston will sometimes join her, kicking back with his belly exposed and purring up storm.

I have spent a great deal of time with these two over the last year, and it is with mixed emotions that I prepare to spend what will likely be my last visits with them for some time to come. They will soon be moving to New York to join their mom, who has taken a job there. While I and their Auntie Marjorie – who has stepped in to provide additional care and company for them while their mom has been transitioning to her new digs – will miss them terribly, I know we’re both very happy that they will soon be spending lots of regular QT with their favorite human in the world:-)

Langston is the dapper short-haired tabby, and Poppy is the sweet long-haired tabby.

March Pet of the Month – Poki

I was pretty new to the business and relatively inexperienced when I started working with Poki, and I remember being a little concerned when she hid under an end-table when I came to take her on our very first walk. You see, Poki is actually very content to stay inside and nap if you’ll let her – her human once described her to me as the “perfect dog for a cat person”.

I don’t recall exactly how I got her out from under that table – I think treats were probably involved – but it wasn’t long before we reached an understanding: She knows that she will get a treat once I’ve been permitted to put her harness on; that I will let her take her time to sniff to her heart’s content on our walks; that 90% of the time I will let her take us along her favorite route, which includes a sometimes-stinky alley that runs behind restaurants; that I will occasionally allow her to eat some treasure that she has found along the way, as long as it’s innocuous (the goldfish cracker that she lunged for on the sidewalk the other day, for example); that I will take care that we avoid the advances of over-zealous dogs whose walkers don’t respect personal space; that if it’s raining I won’t make her stay out any longer than she needs to finish her business, at which point we’ll come back inside and play with the bouncy ball; and that she will get more treats when we return from our walk and she performs her repertoire of tricks, including “up”, “sit”, “paw”, “go find it”, and “lay down”. Sometimes she gets so excited about this last part that she does them all in rapid succession – truly impressive!

I’m looking forward to spring when Poki will once again start rolling in the new grass and will insist that we “sit a spell” and bask in the warm sunshine for a while. We never fail to get big smiles from people walking by when they see her all blissed out on her back, soaking up the rays.

I am grateful that Poki’s guardians took the chance on me as a relatively new and inexperienced walker, and I’m happy to have the opportunity to spend time with Poki each week day, and hope to do so for years to come.

I chose Poki as the first Pet of the Month because March 17 is her adoption anniversary – happy “Gotcha Month”, Poki!

(Going forward, pets of the month will be chosen by random drawing)

Cat Litter Recommendation

Arm & Hammer Clump & Seal is by far the best cat litter I’ve ever used, and here is why:

  • Dust-free (this is important to me for several reasons, not least the health of the cats and humans who have to breath in the dust that gets kicked up from many litters when using or cleaning the box. That the dust doesn’t settle on nearby furniture is an added bonus.)
  • Minimal tracking
  • Great clumping power (as its name helpfully indicates)
  • Fantastic odor control without heavily perfumed litter (at least in the two sub-brands I have used, which are Slide and Fresh Home)

I am not being paid or otherwise incentivised to share this with you. I learned about this litter when I finally asked one of my clients which brand they used, after having mentally noted how much more pleasant the experience of scooping their cat’s box was to that of pretty much any other box I had scooped (and I’ve scooped a lot of boxes). I’ve been using it now for about two months and am still happy with it. In fact, I’ll confess that I haven’t even felt the need to do a thorough dump and clean of the boxes since I started using it, which is something I would otherwise do on a monthly basis.

If you’re happy with the litter you’re using – great. But if you ever decide you want to try something different, you might want to check out this brand, which can be purchased on all the usual websites as well in most larger pet stores (I don’t know about the smaller pet shops). http://www.clumpandseal.com/Reviews.aspx

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Thanks to Claude and his humans for being the catalyst for my changing of brands!

Pet Visit Guidelines

The following suggestions represent the minimum number of visits I believe your pet should receive when you’re away. There are some additional considerations listed after all the cute pics.

PUPPIES UP TO 6 MONTHS OLD

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Overnight care, AND multiple daytime visits. A good general rule of thumb is to take the puppy’s age in months plus one to determine how long between visits. (so a 5 month-old puppy should get a visit every six hours, etc.)

PUPPIES 6 MONTHS TO 1 YEAR 

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Overnight care with two visits during the day

DOGS OVER 1 YEAR

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Overnight care plus one visit during the day, or three visits daily

KITTENS UP TO 6 MONTHS

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Overnight care plus one visit mid-day, or 2-3 visits daily.

CATS 6 MONTHS AND OLDER

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One visit per day

 

Additional considerations:

How long will you be gone? How many pets do you have? What are their personalities?

If you’re going to be gone for longer than a week, I recommend throwing in some additional visits here and there. This could mean the occasional overnight stay, or an extra visit in the middle of the day every few days, or several visits of longer duration.

If your cat is the only pet in the household and is highly sociable/affectionate, and you’re going to be gone longer than three or four days, I recommend two visits a day. This also goes for cats with lots of energy and a tendency to zoom about the house bouncing off walls.

If you have a truly anti-social cat or dog who is traumatized when anyone other than you or your family members come around, fewer visits may actually be more beneficial. For cats under these circumstances, I think you can get away with  visits every other day, although I still prefer at least one visit a day because stuff happens.  For dogs, it is a bit more complicated, and I would consult a behavioralist or qualified trainer when devising a visitation plan.

Boarding

I think there are circumstances in which your pet may be better off at a reputable boarding facility.

Puppies who have all their immunizations may be happier in an environment where they can interact with other dogs under supervision.

Although many pet sitters will administer medication, if your pet is critically ill, or has a newly diagnosed condition such as diabetes or asthma and has not yet become regulated to his or her medication, or is particularly hard to pill, I think a medical board at the vet often makes the most sense.

Environment while you’re away

It is particularly important that puppies and kittens are confined to a small room or pen in between visits from your pet sitter. This area should be free of anything that could pose a choking, strangulation, or drowning hazard (this includes many toys, loose blind cords, and toilets with the lid up). This area should contain comfortable bedding and safe toys (think stuffed animals for kittens, and Kongs for puppies) and an article of clothing with your scent on it.

 

*All photos in this post are courtesy of Pixabay.

 

Unsolicited Advice

I generally try to avoid offering unsolicited pet-related advice to my clients. I view my role as that of a caretaker whose primary responsibility is to ensure the safety and well-being of clients’ pets while they are under my care while adhering to the instructions of the pet’s guardians as closely as possible. If I was a parent to a human baby and my au-pair or daycare employee started giving me advice on how best to raise my child, I think I’d get pretty annoyed. So unless I see something going on that is putting a pet in obvious danger or ill-health, I tend to prefer to leave the pet-parenting to the pet parents.

Having said that, there are a few best-practices that I personally feel are kind of important and think that pet parents should at least be aware of so they can research them further if interested, so I’ll offer up my thoughts on them here.

PETS IN MOVING VEHICLES

I wrote a post about a year ago titled Critters in Cars: Let’s Talk Pet Safety. I think if I had to choose one topic that concerns me most, this would be it. I won’t rehash what I wrote here and invite you to read the original article instead, but the main gist is that pets should always be secured properly while in a moving vehicle.

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Source: http://yandere-simulator-fanon.wikia.com

STICKS AND STONES (AND ICE AND BONES)

I was having dinner with my siblings a few weeks ago, and when I mentioned that I don’t let dogs under my care chew on or chase sticks, my sister rolled her eyes and said “Jeez, can’t you just let dogs be dogs?”. I have no doubt that most dogs would have a lot more fun with my sister than they do with me, at least until they experience one of the many unpleasant-at-best occurrences that are not at all uncommon when dogs are allowed to chew on sticks, rocks, ice, or bones. These include lacerations and infections in the mouth, broken teeth, choking, and perforated or blocked intestines. Stay tuned for a post on some safe chewing alternatives, but feel free to do some online research yourself in the meantime (or ask your vet for some recommendations).

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Source: Pinterest

AND BLIND CORDS!

Every year, children and pets are killed or end up in the ER because they got a blind cord wrapped around their neck. Cats are at particular risk with their tendency to like to play with stringy things. Please make sure any blind cords you have are well-secured and not left dangling, especially if your kitty is playful.

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Source: Blinds.com

KITTIES: KIBBLE VERSUS CANNED

Pet nutrition is a topic that often sparks fierce debate among pet professionals, and one could lose countless hours and a small fortune researching and trying different pet diets. The one theme that stands out for me in this vast sea of conflicting opinions is that cats do better on wet/canned food than on kibble, and that if you’re going to feed your cat kibble, it should be of limited quantity and heavily supplemented with wet food. You can read (lots) more about why at Catinfo.org, but the main gist is that cats very much need the extra water that is provided by wet food, and they very much don’t need the carbs that come from kibble. (Note: This does not seem to hold true for most dogs, who according to my own vet seem to do just fine on a kibble diet, although I am making no recommendations one way or the other on that topic, so be sure to check with your own vet before making any changes to your pet’s diet).

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Source: Petfoodindustry.com

LITTER BOXES

Let me start by saying that if your current litter box setup is working well for you, don’t change anything. But please do keep the following points in mind:

  • Cat boxes should be scooped at least once a day.
  • If you use non-clumping litter, the litter should be entirely replaced at least every other day, preferably every day.
  • Choose a low-dust litter. Your cat is breathing in dust particles every time she uses the box, and the least you can do is to limit the number of dust particles she is forced to take into her lungs.
  • Maintain a litter depth of at least 2 inches. Your cat needs to feel like she has adquately covered up her business.
  • Studies indicate that in general, cats don’t have a preference when it comes to whether their litter box has a lid or not. The important factor seems to be that the litter box is large enough for them. So keep a lid on it if it’s working well for you and your cat isn’t having accidents outside the box, but consider going topless if your kitty is having issues. (You can read more about the studies here).
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Source: Playrightmeow.com

CLEAN PLATES

I think many of us tend to think that because our pets lick their own butts, this means that their digestive systems can handle anything. While they certainly seem to have more hardy systems than our own,  this does not mean that they aren’t succeptible to bateria and viruses. The National Sanitation Foundation found pet bowls to be the fourth most germ-filled place in the home. Bottom line is, it’s important to thoroughly clean your pets’ food and water bowls daily, and to disinfect them periodically, and this IheartDogs article gives some additional details on the whys and hows.

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Source: Nicola Alebertini (Flicker)

Well, that’s about all from pulpit for today. Please feel free to share any thoughts you might have on any of the topics raised here.

Veterinary Medicine Counterfeiting

Someone in a pet sitter forum I’m a member of just posted this article regarding the guilty plea of a CEO who was charged with “intentionally trafficking in counterfeit labels and packaging for anti-parasite products and veterinary medicines between July 2015 and December 2016.”

The EPA is aware of this and also offers some guidance here.

For those of you who use flea and tick products on your cats and dogs, please take the following precautions to ensure that the products you have are legitimate:

1) Check the lot number/expiration date on the retail carton matches the lot number on the applicator package and/or the individual applicators.

2) Determine whether the instruction leaflet is included. It provides the following information: first-aid statements, including emergency US or related Merial branch telephone numbers; precautionary statements for humans and pets; directions for use; Frontline Plus from Merial usually has an adhesive calendar sticker with instructions for use and phone number. Treatment frequency is printed behind the front panel. Visual aids and instructions are also included.

3) The pesticide is contained in an applicator package, which is child-resistant.

4) Text on the package is in English only. There should be no stickers on the package. Related country’s approval numbers and phone numbers are printed on the box.

5) Once you open the applicator package, each individual applicator has a label that includes the registrant’s name “Merial;” the product name; “CAUTION”, “Keep out of reach of children”, “For animal treatment only”; Composition of active ingredient(s) (fipronil for Frontline Top Spot products; and fipronil and (S)-methoprene for Frontline Plus products). Text is in English. Note that for Merial Frontline Plus*: Applicator itself has the lot number and expiration date printed in the front.

 

Summer Pet Safety Tips

(Photo: Poki Soaks up the Sun)

The folks at the FACE Foundation shared these helpful infographics from the Arizona Humane Society with tips for keeping pets safe in the summer heat. As we head into the steamy DC summer, I figured now is a great time to share.

To the tips listed here, I would add something I think most of us know but that unfortunately still happens too often: DON’T LEAVE YOUR PET ALONE IN THE CAR!

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